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Re: Govt economic advisor warns British defence planners that growth is ending... and it's not just the U.K.



One of the primary problems with the nuclear power industry is that all it's initial commercial participants came from military contracting where a key purpose was breeding weapon stockpiles. Pressurized uranium heavy water reactors were the best for this. Safety for civilian use was much less a concern. When safer alternatives, like thorium-based molten salt technologies, were proposed the commercial companies, who were fully invested in solutions coming from their military experience, balked and used their influence to block funding for alternatives.

On Fri, Jul 13, 2018, 9:29 AM jim bell <jdb10987 AT yahoo.com> wrote:
On Friday, July 13, 2018, 8:10:15 AM PDT, John Newman <jnn AT synfin.org> wrote:


On Fri, Jul 06, 2018 at 05:20:30PM +0000, jim bell wrote:
>>  This article sure sounds foolish.  As I see it, the main driver in the increase in "growth"  (other than population) is productivity.  Productivity tends to be driven by gradual adoptions of automation, which has been a major factor for 50+ years, and actually far larger.  Automation isn't going away, and will only increase in effectiveness for decades 
>> Energy is a factor, but society is well on its way to the widespread adoption of solar and wind energy.  Solar is useful in most locations, and wind will eventually be useable just about everywhere, 24 hours per day, with the use of low-resistance materials to conduct that energy, for example metallic carbon nanotubes.  (MCNTs).
>>             Jim Bell


>Personally I wish the "progressive left" could get over its deep fear of
nuclear energy, and we could build some modern reactors. Maybe when (if)
they ever get a fusion reactor that can substain a reaction...


Yes.  A couple of years ago, I looked up some statistics that said that since 1980, about 100 billion tons of coal has been burned for the generation of electricity in the world.  Unfortunately, the eco-nuts of the 1970's, when they opposed nuclear power, thought absolutely nothing about the fact that about half of that CO2 release could have been avoided by the adoption of nuclear power.  

Myself, I'm far from a "global warming believer",   But I think a program like this needs to be operational to determine if the greenhouse effect can be reduced using sulfur dioxide.  (or other sulfur compounds.).    Google search  'MIT sulfur dioxide global warming'.

Two important results from that search:






               Jim Bell




The world’s first nuclear fusion plant is now halfway to ‘First Plasma’

Of course, solar and wind power is great :)  Anything to stop burning
more fucking carbon..

-
John



>
>
>
>    On Friday, July 6, 2018, 9:15:13 AM PDT, Steven Schear <schear.steve AT gmail.com> wrote: 

>  "If we extrapolate this trend forward, labour productivity growth would reach zero by 2028."
> https://medium.com/insurge-intelligence/govt-economic-advisor-warns-british-defence-planners-that-growth-is-ending-abf806f17845



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