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Re: Statement from a Berkely Antifa FashBash participant



"Pre-crimes shall be punished with violence and, if the pre-crime
perpetrator does not cease and decist to continue thinking what they
think, pre-emptive death is the final solution," says Razer.

The question is, will Razer back down from this position, just like his
pathetic favourite film director Judd Apatow
http://www.breitbart.com/big-hollywood/2017/02/01/judd-apatow-supports-far-left-berkeley-riot-warns-just-beginning/

or will more cars have to plow through Razer's Antifa mobs
http://www.breitbart.com/milo/2017/02/02/car-plows-protesters-milo-berkeley-riots/
to survive the knuckle dusting "encouragement against pre-crime",
destruction of personal property, and pre-emptive murder "final
solutions"?

"Hey, you KNEW you were thinking that unacceptable thought, so DON'T
blame ME for putting you into a coma you evil pre-crime thinker!"


 With another bong, anything's possible in his mind.

 With a bong, my thoughts are more equal than others',
 indeed my thoughts are the ultimate truth to which all
 other truths shall bow, by force.



On Thu, Feb 02, 2017 at 05:47:20PM -0800, Razer wrote:
> Milo Yiannopoulos planned to publicly name allegedly undocumented
> students at UC Berkeley, endangering them. Debate over. Shutting him
> down was legal and necessary and UC should have done it but they were
> probably unaware of his intent. So locals and students did it.
> 
> 
> Here's a good example of what happens if teaching staff does something
> stupid like that.
> 
> > SAN JOSE — An Oak Grove High School PE teacher who allegedly told a
> > student that he might be deported once Donald Trump is president has
> > been placed on leave and is under investigation.
> >
> > The teacher, who hasn’t been publicly identified, spoke to a student
> > who was refusing to stand as the national anthem played last week on
> > the campus, Superintendent Chris Funk said.
> >
> > The teacher asked the student to stand. When the student refused, NBC
> > Bay Area reported, the teacher said, “Good luck with being deported
> > now that Donald Trump is president. … You guys had it better here than
> > you will over there.”
> >
> > Other students witnessed the incident. One told NBC Bay Area, “We just
> > stayed seated, quietly, respecting everybody, not saying any rude
> > comments whatsoever.” The student added, “I was actually shocked and
> > angry because I never thought I’d hear this coming from a teacher.”
> >
> > A student reported the incident to school officials, Funk said, and
> > the East Side Union High School District intervened by placing the
> > teacher on paid leave.
> >
> > Funk said that the teacher has been in the district for some time.
> > Pending the outcome of the district’s investigation, the teacher could
> > receive a letter of reprimand or be suspended, he said.
> >
> > In the aftermath of the election, the district has posted a letter on
> > its homepage, saying that students deserve a secure environment to
> > process the election results, and asking teachers to remain neutral,
> > share information, listen to both sides of any issue and create a safe
> > space in class and school for discussion.
> >
> > “No question that some of our students who are undocumented are
> > concerned about deportation and what’s going to happen to their
> > families,” Funk said.
> 
> 
> http://www.mercurynews.com/2016/11/15/san-jose-teacher-allegedly-threatens-student-with-deportation-under-trump/
> 
> Rr
> 
> 
> On 02/02/2017 05:24 PM, Razer wrote:
> >
> >
> >
> > On 02/02/2017 04:46 PM, jim bell wrote:
> >> No, they can't.  And don't call me Shirley!!!
> >>
> >>               Jim Bell
> >>
> >
> > In the state of California anything that might be construed as
> > inculcating hate in students can be banned. Even the color or brand of
> > clothes allowed on school property (Red/Blue/Ben Davis et al) that
> > might cause hate between various sociocultural factions. (Blue-Norteno
> > family roots/Red-Sureno family roots)
> >
> > Schools have pretty much free say over what is permissible within
> > their facilities and with their equipment and ALWAYS have. In the 60s
> > I can't even recount how many students were disciplined for publishing
> > non-hateful anti-war content in school newspapers, by rote... That
> > right has been consistently upheld by every court these cases appear in.
> >
> > ANY potential disruptor to school business or safety (according to the
> > local board of edu) is simply and effectively banned. And considering
> > most neonazi organizations are considered hate groups, promoting it is
> > a no-no on school property. Promoting racism is certainly a no-no, and
> > whether the students Moron was going to "Document" are "Undocumented"
> > according to his wrong opinion, they ARE attending UCB LEGALLY and
> > have a right to be protected from his vilification on school grounds.
> >
> > Rr
> >
> >
> >
> >>
> >> From: Razer <g2s AT riseup.net>
> >> To: cypherpunks AT lists.cpunks.org
> >> Sent: Thursday, February 2, 2017 4:44 PM
> >> Subject: Re: Statement from a Berkely Antifa FashBash participant
> >>
> >>
> >> That's right. Schools have BROAD authority, and hate speech...
> ESPECIALLY the sort that might lead to BULLYING, surely can be limited.
> >>
> >> On 02/02/2017 04:32 PM, jim bell wrote:
> >>> I will add:   
> http://www.firstamendmentschools.org/freedoms/faq.aspx?id=12993
> >>>
> >>> May schools limit the time, place, and manner of student expression?
> >>> Yes, as long as the time, place, and manner regulations are
> reasonable and nondiscriminatory.
> >>> The U.S. Supreme Court has said that "laws regulating the time,
> place or manner of speech stand on a different footing than laws
> prohibiting speech altogether."1First Amendment jurisprudence provides
> that time, place, and manner restrictions on speech are constitutional
> if (1) they are content neutral (i.e., they do not treat speech
> differently based on content); (2) they are narrowly tailored to serve a
> governmental interest; and (3) they leave open ample alternative means
> of expression.
> >>> Courts will generally grant even more deference to time, place, and
> manner restrictions in public schools because students do not possess
> the same level of rights as adults in a public forum. However, the time,
> place, and manner regulations must still be reasonable. This means that
> school officials could limit student distribution of material to certain
> locations and at certain times, but those regulations would need to be
> both reasonable and nondiscriminatory.
> >>> Notes
> >>> 1 Linmark Associates, Inc. v. Township of Willingboro, 431 U.S. 85
> (1977).
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >
>