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Re: Court Forces Fingerprint Phone Unlock





From: John <jnn@synfin.org>

On July 26, 2016 3:08:25 AM EDT, grarpamp <grarpamp@gmail.com> wrote:
>http://9to5mac.com/2016/07/25/touch-id-fingerprint-fbi-law/
>http://9to5mac.com/2016/05/02/federal-court-touch-id-fingerprint/
>http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2016/05/feds-say-suspect-should-rot-in-prison-for-refusing-to-decrypt-drives/
>https://apple.slashdot.org/story/16/07/25/1559208/suspect-required-to-unlock-iphone-using-touch-id-in-second-federal-case
>
> A second federal judge has ruled that a suspect can be compelled to
>unlock their iPhone using their fingerprint in order to give
>investigators access to data which can be used as evidence against
>them. 
[cut]

>Use a long PIN for your encrypted phone. I've abided by this, despite the extreme convenience of the fingerprint scanner,  since I first read about >the 2014 case you referenced..   John


There's another set of possibilities.  Usually, a person has 10 fingers.  They can presumably be scanned in two different axes (or more), and in two different directions, each.   With some additional software, some of those could be assigned to be "duress codes", designed to re-encrypt the data if the person whose fingers are being scanned wants to do that.  Further, again with additional programming, the fingerprint scan function could be automatically disabled if it hadn't been used for an extended period of time.
         Jim Bell